Noteworthy

Isilie Begins In-Depth Review of Ohno Satoshi Drama “Maou”

Ohno Drama Review: Maou Introduction – In Which Isilie Reviews

Isilie has been showing some womderful ambitions in her non-H!P blog, and this post is perhaps her most ambitious yet: it is the first of a three part series on Maou, a drama starring Arashi’s Ohno Satoshi. That may seem like a big ol’ helping of tl;dr – especially if you’re not a fan of the drama (I never seen it) or Ohno (I am)… And it doesn’t work as an introduction to the series, as it’s too involved in the finer points and has enough (minor) spoilers to make it comprehensible for such an audience.

However, it stands up wonderfully as a methodical critical approach to the series, and will probably best serve as an appreciation and viewing guide for those who already know the drama well. So if she’s preaching to the converted, it’s at least with a sermon that rewards deeply for keeping the faith.

Isilie conveniently breaks up this first part into different sections, allowing the section’s goals to define the writing. There’s a Cliff Notes section which you’d expect to be the overall plot of the drama, but instead is a summary of her own personal reactions to the drama and why it appeals to her. Personally, I WOULD appreciate a general overview of the series – but like I said, that may not be suitable for the given audience for this article. They already know what’s what.

Isilie then balances this introduction with a bullet-point summary of flaws in the series – and not just some obligatory attempt to be objective, but real problems the drama seems to have, questions that were not answered satisfactorily.

At the start of the last section, Isilie writes, “It isn’t really so much about a murder-mystery as it is about how perceptions can alter your entire life, how grief and guilt destroy and how much tragedy communication can prevent, even if it is horrible and gut-wrenching.” That’s what’s going to keep me reading her series on the drama, and may even get me to watch the drama itself (though I admittedly have a huge backlog of those on my various hard drives).

It’s that big-concept perspective, with an attention to how the small details make that perspective possible, which is so often the hallmark of great criticism. Isilie is showing she has the drive to do this for Maou, and I’m sure her follow-through in the next two sections will continue to impress.